Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.
Skip to main content

Plain English Allergen Labelling: New allergen labelling information requirements will be in effect from 25 Feb 2024 | Learn more

Primary Production and Processing (PPP) Standards (Chapter 4)

NOTE: these standards apply to all food businesses in Australia only. Food businesses in New Zealand are required to comply with New Zealand's Food Act 2014 and the regulations and standards under this Act. For more information visit the Ministry for Primary Industries website.

Primary production and processing (PPP) standards aim to strengthen food safety and traceability throughout the food supply chain, from paddock to plate. They were developed by FSANZ with assistance from other Australian government agencies, industry stakeholders and consumer groups.

There are 11 standards:

4.1.1 PPP Standards - Preliminary Provisions

View Standard 4.1.1

  • This is an overarching standard that sets out preliminary provisions which apply to the PPP standards contained in Chapter 4 of the Code.

4.2.1 PPP Standard for Seafood

View Standard 4.2.1

  • This standard requires a seafood business to identify potential seafood safety hazards and put controls in place that are consistent with the risk.
  • The standard was developed through Proposal P265.
  • The guide for this standard is Safe Seafood Australia.
  • The guide is intended primarily for government agencies responsible for enforcing the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code. The examples and explanations may also help seafood businesses interpret the Standard. However, businesses wanting guidance on how to comply with the standard should also contact their state or territory enforcement agency.

4.2.2 PPP Standard for Poultry Meat

View Standard 4.2.2

Implementation package

  • This standard aims to lower the prevalence and levels of the two main pathogens that can be present on raw poultry (Campylobacter and Salmonella), to reduce the likelihood of foodborne illness.
  • The standard requires poultry growers to identify and control food safety hazards associated with poultry growing and processing (including slaughtering) and verify the effectiveness of their control measures.
  • The standard was developed through Proposal P282.
  • At the time, FSANZ, in association with federal and state government agencies, coordinated a baseline survey to obtain information on the likelihood of live chickens being contaminated on-farm with Campylobacter and Salmonella, and also the likelihood of their being contaminated after slaughter.
  • An implementation package for this standard has been developed by the Implementation Sub Committee.

4.2.3 PPP Standard for Meat and Meat Products

View Standard 4.2.3

  • This standard recognises that existing state and territory laws already cover requirements relating to inputs (e.g. animal feed and water), traceability and processing of meat, meat products and wild game. If there is a food incident, this standard allows for regulators to investigate food safety matters through the entire meat supply chain.
  • The standard was developed by combining proposals for major meat species (P1005) and minor meat species (P1014) into a single proposal (P1014).

4.2.4 PPP Standard for Dairy Products

View Standard 4.2.4

4.2.5 PPP Standard for Eggs and Egg Products

View Standard 4.2.5

  • This standard aims to reduce foodborne illness associated with eggs (especially cracked and dirty eggs) and egg products, particularly uncooked or lightly-cooked foods containing contaminated raw egg (e.g. sauces and desserts).
  • It requires egg producers and processors to identify and control egg safety hazards, prohibits the sale of dirty or cracked eggs (unless they are sold to a processor for pasteurisation), and requires eggs to be stamped with the producers unique identification so they can be traced.
  • The standard was developed through Proposal P301.
    • The standard introduced requirements for eggs by:
      • legally requiring egg producers and processors to identify and control safety hazards, such as ensuring feed is not contaminated.
      • prohibiting the sale of cracked and dirty eggs unless they are sold to a processor for pasteurisation.
      • requiring individual eggs to be stamped with the producers or processors' unique identification so they can be traced.

Review of Standard 4.2.5

  • FSANZ has commenced a proposal to consider amending the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code to provide new and/or amended food safety and primary production requirements for eggs and egg products.
  • Further information is provided under Proposal P1060.

 

4.2.6 PPP Standard for Seed Sprouts

View Standard 4.2.6

  • The aim of this standard is to reduce the incidence of foodborne illness associated with seed sprouts (e.g. of alfalfa, onion, radish, mung bean).
  • The standard was developed through Proposal P1004.
  • Further information is on the Food safety in horticulture page.

4.2.7 PPP Standard for Berries

View Standard 4.2.7​

  • This standard aims to reduce the incidence of foodborne illness associated with berries.​
  • The standard requires growers and primary processors (e.g. pack-house) to identify and control food safety hazards associated with berry growing and primary processing, and to notify regulators of their activities.​​
  • The standard was developed through Proposal P1052.​
  • Berries are defined in the standard as fresh berries and includes berries such as strawberries, blueberries and berries from the genus Rubus. Examples of berries included are, but not limited to those listed and raspberries, blackberries, boysenberry, loganberry, silvanberry and youngberry
  • Further guidance is on the Food safety in horticulture page.

4.2.8 PPP Standard for Leafy Vegetables

View Standard 4.2.8

  • This standard aims to reduce the incidence of foodborne illness associated with fresh leafy vegetables.​
  • The standard requires growers and primary processors (e.g. pack-house) to identify and control food safety hazards associated with growing and primary processing of leafy vegetables. An approved food safety management statement, which includes notifying regulators, is required.​
  • The standard was developed through Proposal P1052.​
  • Leafy vegetables have been defined in the standard as vegetables of a leafy nature where the leaf is consumed raw; and includes baby leaves, lettuce, and leafy herbs; and does not include seed sprouts (covered in Std 4.2.6). ​​
  • Examples of leafy vegetables include but are not limited to all lettuces (iceberg (crisphead), rocket, romaine (cos), red leaf, butterhead, endive, oak leaf, watercress, raddachio, baby leaf, battavia, all other loose-leaf lettuces), kale, chicory, watercress, swiss chard, Asian leafy greens (e.g. bok choy), all leafy herbs consumed raw (e.g. parsley, basil, coriander, dill, fennel leaves, mint, thyme, rosemary, oregano, marjoram, chives), spring onions, microgreens, spinach leaves, silverbeet and cabbage.​
  • ​Examples of vegetables that are not considered leafy vegetables include broccoli, broccolini, cauliflower, asparagus, artichoke, root and tuber vegetables, bulb vegetables, brussel sprouts, kohlrabi, cucumbers, peppers, eggplant, rhubarb, squash, celery and leek.
  • Further guidance is on the Food safety in horticulture page.

4.2.9 PPP Standard for Melons

View Standard 4.2.9​

  • This standard aims to reduce the incidence of foodborne illness associated with melons.​
  • The standard requires growers and primary processors (e.g. pack-house) to identify and control food safety hazards associated with growing and primary processing of melons. An approved food safety management statement, which includes notifying regulators, is required.​
  • The standard was developed through Proposal P1052.​
  • Melons have been defined in the standard as fresh melons and includes watermelon, rockmelon, honeydew melon and piel de sapo. Examples of melons include, but are not limited to, those listed above and galia melon, charentais melon, Korean melon, hami melon.
  • Further guidance is on the Food safety in horticulture page.

Standard 4.5.1 Wine production requirements

View Standard 4.5.1

  • This standard is for the production of wine in Australia only. It includes compositional requirements for wine, sparkling wine and fortified wine and permitted substances for their production.
  • This standard was developed through Proposal P253

 

Page last updated 27 February 2024