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ATDS_22Results

Iodine

In relation to iodine intakes:

  • most adult respondents had dietary intakes below the EAR;
  • no population groups approached the UL; and
  • major contributing foods to dietary iodine intake were similar in adults and children and included milk, yoghurt, ice cream, tap water, iodised salt, soft drink and eggs.

Selenium

In relation to selenium intakes:

the prevalence of selenium intakes below the EAR ranged from 0% to 56% across the various population groups assessed;

  • less than 1% of males aged 2-18 years had intakes greater than their respective age group ULs, but this finding is not considered to be of concern as these ULs are highly conservative estimates. Other population groups did not exceed their respective ULs; and
  • concentrations of selenium in some foods, and total intakes, appear to be lower in this study than previously estimated in the 20th ATDS;
  • major contributors to dietary intake of selenium were bread, cereal, chicken, pasta, beef, fish and eggs.

Molybdenum

In relation to molybdenum intakes:

the majority of respondents had dietary intakes well above the EAR;

  • there were no concerns about excessive dietary intake among the Australian population groups assessed; and
  • major food contributors to dietary intake of molybdenum were bread, milk, rice, peanut butter, cereal and soy beverage.

Chromium

In relation to chromium intakes:

this study has generated Australian intake estimates for the first time;

  • most population groups had mean dietary intakes approaching or above the AI, which was established using US data; and
  • major contributors to dietary intake of chromium were bread, cereal, milk, juice, cake, deli meats, chocolate, tea and beer.

Nickel

In relation to nickel intakes:

this study has generated Australian intake estimates for the first time;

  • due to the absence of nutrient reference values for nickel in Australia, no risk characterisation has been performed; and
  • major contributors to dietary intake of nickel were bread, cake, peanut butter, cereal, chocolate and tea.

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